Queen in the North.
21 October 2014 @ 3:23 AM

(Source: iheartgot)

6 hours ago via donewithwoodenteeth (originally iheartgot)
20 October 2014 @ 9:01 PM
brienneofthrace:

Horriblarious. 
(found on facebook)

brienneofthrace:

Horriblarious. 

(found on facebook)

12 hours ago via brienneofthrace (originally brienneofthrace)
20 October 2014 @ 11:37 AM
"(Unlike what’s been said in the TV show) the mines haven’t emptied, and are considered the best in the world. Even in Asshai, they ask about Casterly Rock, which they believe to be a ‘palace of gold’."

George R.R. Martin, at ConCarolinas 2014  [source]

The show is not the books. The Lannister mines *in the books* are not empty. GRRM says the Lannister mines *in the books* are not empty.

The financial obligations of the Iron Throne and those of House Lannister are treated as entirely separate in the books. See this conversation between Tyrion and Tywin from A Storm of Swords:

"Extravagance has its uses. We must demonstrate the power and wealth of Casterly Rock for all the realm to see."

"Then perhaps Casterly Rock should pay."

"Why? I have seen Littlefinger’s accounts. Crown incomes are ten times higher than they were under Aerys."

"As are the crown’s expenses. Robert was as generous with his coin as he was with his cock. Littlefinger borrowed heavily. From you, amongst others. Yes, the incomes are considerable, but they are barely sufficient to cover the usury on Littlefinger’s loans. Will you forgive the throne’s debt to House Lannister?"

"Don’t be absurd."

The Iron Throne under Tommen is near bankruptcy; House Lannister is not. In The Princess and the Queen, when there was a national surplus, this is what was done with the royal treasury:

Ser Tyland Lannister was named master of coin in place of the late Lord Beesbury, and acted at once to seize the royal treasury. The crown’s gold was divided into four parts. One part was entrusted to the care of the Iron Bank of Braavos for safekeeping, another sent under strong guard to Casterly Rock, a third to Oldtown. The remaining wealth was to be used for bribes and gifts, and to hire sellswords if needed.

Casterly Rock and Oldtown served as the Fort Knox of Westeros. The problem at the end of ADWD is that the Crown doesn’t have the money to buy sellswords:

“Sellswords fight for coin,” declared Grand Maester Pycelle. “With enough gold, we might persuade the Golden Company to hand over Lord Connington and the pretender.” 

“Aye, if we had gold,” Ser Harys Swyft said. “Alas, my lords, our vaults contain only rats and roaches. I have written again to the Myrish bankers. If they will agree to make good the crown’s debt to the Braavosi and extend us a new loan, mayhaps we will not have to raise the taxes. Elsewise—”

“The magisters of Pentos have been known to lend money as well,” said Ser Kevan. “Try them.” The Pentoshi were even less like to be of help than the Myrish money changers, but the effort must be made. Unless a new source of coin could be found, or the Iron Bank persuaded to relent, he would have no choice but to pay the crown’s debts with Lannister gold. 

During his last small council session, Kevan worries that they will have to start using Lannister gold to pay the Crown’s debt. GRRM says the Lannisters still have money!!

21 hours ago via joannalannister (originally joannalannister)
20 October 2014 @ 10:46 AM

(Source: daerysa)

22 hours ago via imhappyhopeyourehappytoo (originally daerysa)
20 October 2014 @ 7:50 AM
1 day ago via nobodysuspectsthebutterfly (originally stormbornvalkyrie)
20 October 2014 @ 6:49 AM

mhysas:

they were meant to have them

1 day ago via donewithwoodenteeth (originally mhysas)
19 October 2014 @ 10:19 PM

Margaery’s kindness had been unfailing,

and her presence changed everything.

1 day ago via tywins (originally tywins)
18 October 2014 @ 7:58 PM
asoiafuniversity:

Why Sansa Stark’s Dress From Last Night’s ‘Game Of Thrones’ Was The Most Perfect Costume Choice Of All Time
By Rosie Narasaki, bustle.com

Sansa’s done more than learn from her captor/torturer/style icon Cersei: It looks like the student has surpassed the master. Because remember when Oberyn Martell told Tyrion how Cersei had tried and failed at emotional manipulation with him? Well, Sansa just categorically won all the emotional manipulation awards ever on Sunday’s episode — and she made sure to dress accordingly.
After almost three full seasons of being a powerless hostage, Sansa’s finally talking back. We first saw a glimpse of it a few weeks ago when she tearfully told Aunt Lysa that Littlefinger hadn’t tried anything with her (and he hadn’t… yet) — she used her admittedly tragic past to her advantage to convince Aunt Lysa that she had no designs on him.
And this week, she takes it a step further, conflating truth and fiction so very seamlessly that she’s able to successfully convince a whole panel of suspicious Eyrie elders of Littlefinger’s innocence. It’s a masterful move (both by Sansa herself and actor, Sophie Turner), and her calculated, through-crocodile-tears-look at Littlefinger shows us that she’s playing with the big leagues now.
Her subsequent scene with him (“I know what you want”) adds feathers (no pun intended) to her cap, and her dress clinches it. Sansa’s always been a survivor, but this is a dress that lets us know she’s playing the infamously life-or-death game of thrones for keeps.

Sure, it’s unfortunate that the ever-creepy Littlefinger is the ally she chooses, but at least we know she’s making very calculated risks — because it’s not blind loyalty or even fear that drove her to save him, but an aptitude for self-preservation and manipulation that we only wish her mom and dad had. And it’s this Maleficent-worthy dress that seals the deal — or rather, puts the nails in the coffins of her enemies.
It’s the perfect marriage between character development and costuming. Major props to the Game of Thrones costume department for creating the dress of the season (it even beats Dany’s post-Daario dress, and Margaery’s roses-and-thorns wedding dress, IMHO). It’s a character-defining dress that has rightfully taken over Twitter, Tumblr, and just about every GoT recap, ever — and I’m sure we’ll be seeing it on scores of future cosplayers to come.

asoiafuniversity:

Why Sansa Stark’s Dress From Last Night’s ‘Game Of Thrones’ Was The Most Perfect Costume Choice Of All Time

By Rosie Narasaki, bustle.com

Sansa’s done more than learn from her captor/torturer/style icon Cersei: It looks like the student has surpassed the master. Because remember when Oberyn Martell told Tyrion how Cersei had tried and failed at emotional manipulation with him? Well, Sansa just categorically won all the emotional manipulation awards ever on Sunday’s episode — and she made sure to dress accordingly.

After almost three full seasons of being a powerless hostage, Sansa’s finally talking back. We first saw a glimpse of it a few weeks ago when she tearfully told Aunt Lysa that Littlefinger hadn’t tried anything with her (and he hadn’t… yet) — she used her admittedly tragic past to her advantage to convince Aunt Lysa that she had no designs on him.

And this week, she takes it a step further, conflating truth and fiction so very seamlessly that she’s able to successfully convince a whole panel of suspicious Eyrie elders of Littlefinger’s innocence. It’s a masterful move (both by Sansa herself and actor, Sophie Turner), and her calculated, through-crocodile-tears-look at Littlefinger shows us that she’s playing with the big leagues now.

Her subsequent scene with him (“I know what you want”) adds feathers (no pun intended) to her cap, and her dress clinches it. Sansa’s always been a survivor, but this is a dress that lets us know she’s playing the infamously life-or-death game of thrones for keeps.

Sure, it’s unfortunate that the ever-creepy Littlefinger is the ally she chooses, but at least we know she’s making very calculated risks — because it’s not blind loyalty or even fear that drove her to save him, but an aptitude for self-preservation and manipulation that we only wish her mom and dad had. And it’s this Maleficent-worthy dress that seals the deal — or rather, puts the nails in the coffins of her enemies.

It’s the perfect marriage between character development and costuming. Major props to the Game of Thrones costume department for creating the dress of the season (it even beats Dany’s post-Daario dress, and Margaery’s roses-and-thorns wedding dress, IMHO). It’s a character-defining dress that has rightfully taken over Twitter, Tumblr, and just about every GoT recap, ever — and I’m sure we’ll be seeing it on scores of future cosplayers to come.

2 days ago via asoiafuniversity (originally asoiafuniversity)
18 October 2014 @ 7:57 PM

Sansa slipped in among them, murmuring greetings as she worked her way toward the front. She recognized black-skinned Jalabhar Xho, gloomy Ser Aron Santagar, the Redwyne twins Horror and Slobber… only none of them seemed to recognize her. Or if they did, they shied away as if she had the grey plague. Sickly Lord Gyles covered his face at her approach and feigned a fit of coughing, and when funny drunken Ser Dontos started to hail her, Ser Balon Swann whispered in his ear and he turned away.
And so many others were missing. Where had the rest of them gone? Sansa wondered. Vainly, she searched for friendly faces. Not one of them would meet her eyes. It was as if she had become a ghost, dead before her time.

(Source: sansalayned)

2 days ago via donewithwoodenteeth (originally sansalayned)
18 October 2014 @ 5:42 PM

brienneoftarth:

Director Michelle MacLaren, Game of Thrones Season Three DVD Commentary.

2 days ago via lionsandsapphires (originally brienneoftarth)